Clinic Calendar

Clinics are free to attend for any of our paid convention attendees, however there is a modest charge for the materials used in some of the clinics. If you want to attend one of the clinics that involves a cost or has a limit, please send an email to the Clinic Coordinator (2019ngrcclinics@rcgrs.com) to put your name on a list of attendees for those clinics. Payment for the clinics will be made at the Registration Desk at the convention when you arrive.

Details on all the clinics are described below. Just click on a clinic title in the calendar and your browser will take you to the description. Biographies of the presenters are also available below; click the name of the presenter to see those. To see any of the pictures in a separate window or tab, just click on the picture.

To get a printable version of this schedule click here. I suggest you scale it down to 50% and print in landscape mode to get it all on one piece of paper.

Tuesday, 27 August

Time       3 Sisters Room Mt. Bachelor Room Mt. Hood Room Mt. St. Helens Room Ross Island Room
 
3:00
 
Berneberg - Introduction to 3D Printing
Meyers - Three Methods for Scratch Building Wooden Models
Veldhuizen - Building a Garden Layout with Layout Command Control (LCC)
Fant - Prototype Operations Using Automation
No Clinic
 
4:00
 
Reeves - Locolinc Series 200
No Clinic
Veldhuizen - Implementing Layout Command Control (LCC) in the Garden
Jahn - Special Effects for the Model Railroader
Meyers - Make & Take: A Track-Side Shanty
 
5:00
 
Herzog - Building Concrete Roadbed for Your Garden Railroad
Norris - Landscaping Your Railway
Lawler - Weathering Techniques
 
6:00
 
DINNER BREAK
 
7:00
 
Herzog - Building Hard Shell Concrete Mountains and Artificial Rocks for Your Garden RR
Norris - Hands On: Pruning Railway Trees
Baullinger - Building a Portable Indoor Layout
Meyers - Make & Take: Short-Line Water Tower and Pump House
 
8:00
 
No Clinic No Clinic
Baullinger - Dual Floating Roadbed - An Alternative

Wednesday, 28 August

Time       3 Sisters Room Mt. Bachelor Room Mt. Hood Room Mt. St. Helens Room Ross Island Room
 
 
 
NO CLINICS - BBQ!

Thursday, 29 August

Time       3 Sisters Room Mt. Bachelor Room Mt. Hood Room Mt. St. Helens Room Ross Island Room
 
3:00
 
Berneberg - Introduction to 3D Printing
Norris - Landscaping Your Railway
Eckardt - The Laser Cutter/Engraver as a Modeling Tool
No Clinic
4:00
5:00
6:00
Free time! Relax. Visit the Vendor Hall.
 
7:00
 
Berneberg - The Latest Developments in 3D Printers
Yankee - Small Scale Trees and Plants
Eckardt - The Laser Cutter/Engraver as a Modeling Tool
Olson - Make & Take: Need Something for Your Railroad? Sculpey It!
 
8:00
 
Fant - Implementing Realism and PTC in Locomotives
No Clinic
Bunza - Animation in Model Railroads

Friday, 30 August

Time       3 Sisters Room Mt. Bachelor Room Mt. Hood Room Mt. St. Helens Room Ross Island Room
 
3:00
 
Berneberg - The Latest Developments in 3D Printers
Lee - Make & Take: Line-Side Platform with a Shelter (Part 1)
Verducci - Garden Railroad Design and Construction
Bunza - Make & Take: Model Railroading with Arduinos
 
4:00
 
No Clinic
Rasmussen - Creating Realistic Artificial Trees
 
5:00
 
Herzog - Building Hard Shell Concrete Mountains and Artificial Rocks for Your Garden RR
Lawler - Weathering Techniques

Saturday, 31 August

Time       3 Sisters Room Mt. Bachelor Room Mt. Hood Room Mt. St. Helens Room Ross Island Room
 
2:00
 
No Clinic
Lee - Make & Take: Line-Side Platform with a Shelter (Part 2)
Meyers - Tools and Techniques for Scratch Buildings
No Clinic
 
3:00
 
Clarke, Derville - Body-Mount Kadee Coupler Conversion
Verducci - Building Structures for Your Garden Railroad
Meyers - Make & Take: One of Three Railroad Shacks--Outhouse, Telephone, Tool Shed
 
4:00
 
Engel - 3D Printing for Repairs and Casting
Meyers - Make & Take: Railroad Yard Machine Shop


Norm Baullinger

Norm Baullinger has been in garden railroading since 2009 and had his railroad open for the 2010 national convention in Tacoma. He has expanded his railroad over the years overcoming a five foot vertical ground change, building trestles, bridges, buildings, and some of his turnouts, He has written several articles for Garden Railways magazine and regularly gives a clinic at the club’s annual clinic meeting. He has been a clinic, coordinator, vice president and president of his club, Puget Sound Garden Railroad Society.


Building a Portable Indoor Layout
Tuesday, 27 August, 7:00 - 8:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

Our club, Puget Sound Garden Railroad Society (PSGRS), has had an indoor layout that they took to train shows. Parts of it were 30 years old, it was heavy, hard to assemble, and just needed a fair amount of general repair. Last year the club authorized funds to build a new layout. This one is all aluminum, lighter, has more room for scenery and a third mainline, and more yard storage. This clinic describes the process of defining requirements, designing, the track plan, fabrication, wiring, and laying track.


Dual Floating Roadbed - An Alternative
Tuesday, 27 August, 8:00 - 9:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room,

Over the years I’ve had troubles with my railroad tracks being lifted, separated, rails pulled from ties, etc. For me, the issue turned out to be that the track was fastened, via the ties, to a “hard” roadbed fixed in the ground. When the ground moves or track expands/shrinks due to temperature change, the track is forced to follow and the result is often separated track, pulled rail from ties, and gravel ballast under the ties raising the rails. After fighting this for years, I came up with the idea of having the “hard” roadbed float on top of a crushed gravel roadbed and then fasten the track to the roadbed using short metal strips that allow the track to move (float) on top of the hard roadbed. No issues since then.

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Steven Berneberg

Steven Berneberg is a retired Electronics Engineer with background in Navigation Systems and Industrial Automation. Currently he is a Robotics advisor for FRC, Greenfield High School and contributor to Garden Railway magazine.


Introduction To 3D Printing
Tuesday, 27 August, 3:00 - 4:00, 3 Sisters Room
Thursday, 29 August, 3:00 - 4:00, 3 Sisters Room

Introduction to the different types of 3D printing, what 3D printer companies are out there, what computer aided design (DAC) software is available, what you can and cannot do with low cost printers and do you really need a 3D printer.


The Latest Developments in 3D Printers
Thursday, 29 August, 7:00 - 8:00, 3 Sisters Room
Friday, 30 August, 3:00 - 400, 3 Sisters Room

The 3D printer technology is forever changing. What is the latest and how does that help me in Garden Railroading. We will explore what is needed to print in two colors, what to look for in a 3D pinter, what type of 3D printer might you want, SLA printing topics, SLS printing topics.

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Geoff Bunza

The 2019 NGRC is proud to announce that Dr. Geoff Bunza, a nationally recognized expert in electronic model railroad animation will be presenting two clinics at the Portland convention this coming August. These two clinics, on separate days, although independent, will be mutually enhancing of ones skills in the area of electronic animation resources. Please refer to the clinic descriptions below for more details on them.

Dr. Geoff Bunza started as a Model Railroader when he received a Mantua train set for Christmas, at age 6. He fed his interests through college becoming a member of the Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC) at MIT while getting his doctorate and three other degrees in Electrical Engineering. He models the New York Central Railroad, the Great Northern Railway, and Maine narrow gauge in HOn30. Scale model animation in HO is one of his great interests. Geoff has authored numerous articles on animation for Model Railroad Hobbyist, the New York Central System Historical Society Modeler Magazine, Railroad Model Craftsman, and HO Collector. He has presented clinics for the NMRA at Division, Regional and National meets, and the National Narrow Gauge Conventions, which have been extremely popular and usually sell out fast.

For a sample of ideas that Dr. Bunza has published and presents you might check out this web site: http://scalemodelanimation.com/. And take a look at some of his work on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/DrGeoffB.


Animation in Model Railroads
Thursday, 29 August, 8:00 - 9:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

Animation means giving life to things. Scale model animation is making models behave as if they were alive in miniature — to scale. Traditional model railroaders focus mostly on train movement, naturally enough. But the availability of miniature motors, low cost electronic controls, ultra small LED (Light Emitting Diode) lighting, and small sound generators has opened up new opportunities for the modeler.

This clinic provides an introduction to scale model animation, combining the elements of lighting, motion, sound, and synchronization to tell a story, much like modeling a small scene. It will be a whirlwind tour combining detailed presentation with demonstrations and handouts. We start with LED lighting: selection, wiring, and lighting effects, "moving" on to different kinds of motors and driving mechanisms to provide smooth, slow, realistic movement, and "soundly" following with recording, editing, and sound reproduction.

All these elements provide challenges and opportunities for a modeler. Making them all happen in sequence, in time, requires some special synchronization, ranging from simple to complex. Sometimes, such serendipity stems from simple contact switches, but other, more complex scenes need some digital intervention to animate. With some pointers to materials sources and projects, modelers can take away more than a few starting points for their own projects.

This clinic explores the essential animation elements concerning lighting, movement, and sound, and their respective components.

Here are some pictures of work in progress on concrete roadbeds.



Make & Take: Model Railroading with Arduinos
Friday, 30 August, 3:00 - 6:00 (3 hours), Ross Island Room

This clinic will feature a special "Make and Take" theme showing modelers how to combine small Arduino controllers, LEDs, Servos, and other goodies to create many different working features for modeling. You can take all the project materials home with you too. Model railroad author Dr. Geoff Bunza, with additional expert help, will show you how to bring your projects to life. You should bring your own Windows laptop to set everything up for your own use.

The clinic is presented in three segments: an introductory presentation, installation of tools, and construction projects for attendees. This clinic is not about technical details nor is it a show of previously built models. It is all about giving a modeler some new tools to build their own really interesting models. No soldering nor programming is required for this clinic. Modelers will learn how to set up their laptops, and use an Arduino Uno for a wide range of modeling projects. A variety of interesting lighting projects will be explained and demonstrated. Other projects include servo control for model movement. All materials will be provided, which each modeler can take home with them. We will have staff on hand to give individual attention to everyone who attends and get you up and building your own projects.

Attendees will receive an Arduino Uno, a USB cable, a 9G servo motor, and an assortment of LEDs and jumpers. All projects, setups and software will be provided on your own USB drive.

Attendees will setup the tools to use their own Arduino Uno and build their own lighting and servo motor projects.

Modelers must bring their own Windows laptop (WinXp or later), not a Mac or Linux, to load their tools and projects.
Materials for this clinic will cost $30. Payment will be collected at the Registration Desk in the hotel. The clinic attendance is limited to 20 participants.

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Sam Clarke and Bill Derville

Sam Clarke "Sam the Answer Man" is the Kadee coupler conversion specialist. Bill Derville is the President of the Rose City Garden Railway Society, which is hosting the 2019 National Garden Railway Convention, and 2019 NGRC Committee Chairman. Bill has personally mounted body mount couplers on over 100 cars.


Body-Mount Kadee Coupler Conversion
Saturday, 31 August, 3:00 - 4:00, 3 Sisters Room

Sam Clarke and Bill Derville jointly present a clinic covering the conversion of rolling stock from truck-mounted to body-mounted couplers. Bill will give a power point presentation on how to mount body-mount couplers. Sam will explain the different coupler options.

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Joe Eckardt

Joe Eckardt is a hardware/software design engineer who has worked for several big-name companies including Tektronix, Intel, and HP Inc., designing microprocessor-based products. He has modeled in HO, HOn3, and garden Fn3, and loves building structures and details out of wood. He also provides custom HW/SW design for garden railroads and custom laser cutting services through Eckardt Design, LLC (info@eckardtdesign.com).


The Laser Cutter/Engraver as a Modeling Tool
Thursday, 29 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room
Thursday, 29 August, 7:00 - 8:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

In this clinic we will provide an overview of laser cutters types, their applications, how they work, and how they can effectively be applied to model railroading. We will discuss what the laser cutter can do for us, and how to leverage their capabilities for your modeling.

Our focus will be on how to prepare designs that can be provided to a laser shop so that you get back the parts you expect. As such, we will discuss design considerations, design flow, and overviews of some of the tools you can use to create your designs.

Joe has customized two laser cutters and can supply parts such as scale custom windows and doors, detail parts, and complete kits made from wood, acrylic, and other laser cut materials to modelers in our hobby.

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John Engel

                 

John Engel is a retired "working type" Engineer, that spent most of his working life designing and fabricating boxes for special purpose processes and instrumentation, first as an Air Force engineer, then after retirement as an engineer at Boeing.


3D Printing for Repairs and Casting
Saturday, 31 August, 4:00 - 5:00, 3 Sisters Room

This clinic will cover the design and 3D printing of parts to be used as replacements and repairs (such as a coupler on an Aristocraft E8), and as models for casting nonferrous metals such as specialized lead weights used on an Aristocraft Pacific steam engine. If time permits, I will cover the difference between two plastic filaments for 3D printing, tricks I have learned for 3D printing, Acetone vapor bath smoothing (rail brace for an Aristocraft R53) and friction welding plastic for repair and joining 3D printed items.

Here are a few images of some of the things that John has done with 3D printing.

Rail braces for an RS3

    
Lead weights for engine trucks


Mounting post and adapter for an E3 coupler

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Jonathan Fant

Jonathan is an electrical engineer with professional registration in 18 states. He is the founder and chief engineer for Scaled Automation. Visit his web site at scaledautomation.com.








Prototype Operations Using Automation
Tuesday, 27 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Mt. St. Helens Room

Techniques for automating model railroads to enable prototypical operations. Signaling, turnout control, and Central Traffic Control will be covered. An introduction to Positive Train Control will be included.

Here's a couple of pictures of what Jonathan has built.

Layout Controller CTC Display



Implementing Realism and PTC in Locomotives
Thursday, 27 August, 8:00 - 9:00, 3 Sisters Room

Taking locomotive and train dynamics to the next level of realism will be covered. An overview of the physics of motion and prototype responses will be presented. Discussion of the methods being used to implement PTC (Positive Train Control) on prototypes will be included and how this can be applied to scale railroads.

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David Herzog

David Herzog has been involved in model railroading since he was 4 years old. He has modeled in scales from N to 2.5". He is currently modeling 2.5" NG with 7 1/2" track and also leading the G Scale efforts and layout at Pacific Northwest Live Steamers in Molalla, OR. He also built his father’s first 3 G gauge layouts at the famed Miniature Plant Kingdom, including 3 bridges, 2 detailed concrete viaducts, and a 74' redwood trestle and scratch-built Howe truss bridge.





Building Concrete Roadbed for Your Garden Railroad
Tuesday, 27 August, 5:00 - 6:00, 3 Sisters Room

I will present 2 ways of land survey which I use including figuring out grade and staking out survey markers which work out very well for me. Also included will be note sheets for participants to take with them. Topics covered besides surveying the land, dig out of trenches, forming and reinforcing concrete roadbed, mixing and pouring concrete the correct consistency, and finishing concrete. grinding out imperfections, attaching track and simple ballasting. I will also have examples of hand and powered tools I use in construction and finishing of concrete roadbed.

Here are some pictures of work in progress on concrete roadbeds.



Building Hard Shell Concrete Mountains and Artificial Rocks for Your Garden RR
Tuesday, 27 August, 7:00 - 8:00, 3 Sisters Room
Friday, 30 August, 5:00 - 6:00, 3 Sisters Room

Topics covered are land preparation, materials and methods used to create large rocks to huge mountains from concrete for a realistic rock addition without the cost of purchasing many tons of boulders to create massive elevation changes. There will be a presentation of examples from other Garden railroaders where I learned different methods to create your own rock with rubber and aluminum foil molds. This particular clinic will also cover the future construction of the 1/4" scale operating model of Multnomah Falls on highway 84 at PNLS.

Here are some pictures of building rocks from concrete.

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Bruce Jahn

Bruce Jahn has been heavily involved in G scale since joining the Bay Area Garden Railway Society in 1988. Although his home layout is tiny, since his introduction to G scale his primary interest has been in BAGRS’ modular railway where he was the chair from 1992 to 2006. In 2007 the modular group broke away from BAGRS with a name change to the Diablo Pacific Short Line. The DPSL sets up and displays at about 15 venues each year.  Bruce’s many modules contain a myriad of animation scenes which have taught him some basics of electronics which he’d like share.



Special Effects for the Model Railroader
Tuesday, 27 August, 4:00 - 5:00, Mt. St. Helens Room

This presentation is directed to those railroaders who’ve yet to step into the world of Arduino.  Using simple electronics, Bruce will show many LED lighting and gear motor applications in an elementary way hopefully understood by the least electronics minded, just like himself. Most of Bruce’s offerings reflect his successes with his modules as well as animation items built for friends with railways in the dirt. His demonstrations will include operating pieces and video of those he’s unable to bring to Portland. Included will be his favorite source list, some simple schematics and an often humorous slant on his failures.

Watch the videos below, to see some of Jahn's animation efforts.

   

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Rick Lawler

Rick Lawler fell in love building models at the age of 5 and has continued the pursuit ever since. In 2007 Rick became a professional in the scale modeling industry where he has contributed to numerous museum, entertainment and commercial exhibits as well as authoring hundreds of articles on the topics of painting and weathering for audiences worldwide.


Weathering Techniques
Tuesday, 27 August, 5:00 - 6:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room
Friday, 30 August, 5:00 - 6:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St Helens Room

Join Rick Lawler for a practical session on how to transform your rolling stock to take on a real-life appearance. Subjects covered will include airbrushing, selecting the proper types of paints and application techniques to create a variety of finishes.

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Gary Lee

Gary Lee is a retired Designer-Builder. He has been active in the Rose City Garden Railway Society since 2001. Producing custom structure kits for fellow club members is his forte. He earned his MMR certification in garden railroading.


Make & Take: Line-Side Platform with a Shelter (Two Parts)
Part 1: Friday, 30 August, 3:00 - 6:00 (3 hours), Mt. Bachelor Room
Part 2: Saturday, 31 August, 2:00 - 5:00 (3 hours), Mt. Bachelor Room;

During this “Make and Take” workshop, you will assemble an all-wood kit of a lineside platform with a shelter. The model is based upon the whistle stop “Guston Station” on the Silverton Railroad. Construction techniques used for scratch-building will be demonstrated. Here's a picture of the completed station. Sorry, but the barrels, bags, boxes, and person are not included.


Note that this is a 2-part clinic, each 3 hours long. The construction will start in the first clinic and complete in the second clinic. Please allow time to attend both clinics, especially the first one, in order to complete the project. The end result, as well as what you will learn during this clinic, will be well worth the time.

The cost of materials for this clinic is $65 per kit. Sign up and payment for materials for this clinic is done at the time you register for the convention. This clinic is currently fully attended.

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John Meyers

John Meyers, a retired high school physics teacher of 40 years, has been an avid modeler since his youth. Currently he designs wooden kits of western buildings from the 1890s to the 1930s for G-Scale hobbyists to build for their layouts featuring logging and mining.




Three Methods for Scratch Building Wooden Models
Tuesday, 27 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Mt. Bachelor Room

In this clinic, three techniques for building models from scratch will be discussed and demonstrated. This information will be useful for modelers building totally from scratch, kit-bashing, or following a prepared kit. No experience necessary.


Make & Take: A Track-Side Shanty
Tuesday, 27 August, 4:00 - 6:00 (2 hours), Ross Island Room

In this workshop you will learn the techniques of modular construction for making scratch-built wooden structures. A track-side shanty will be made in class to take home.

This hands-on clinic is limited to 20 participants, first come, first served.

All materials and tools will be supplied; sorry, but tools must be returned. The cost of the materials is $35; payment will be collected at the Registration Desk in the hotel prior to the clinic.


Make & Take: Short-Line Water Tower and Pump House
Tuesday, 27 August, 7:00 - 9:00 (2 hours), Ross Island Room

In this workshop you will build a wooden water tower with a pump house that will fit anywhere on your railroad line.

This hands-on clinic is limited to 10 participants, first come, first served.

All materials and tools will be supplied; sorry, but tools must be returned. The cost of the materials is $35; payment will be collected at the Registration Desk in the hotel prior to the clinic.


Make & Take: One Of Three RR Yard Shacks: Outhouse, Telephone, Tool Shed
Saturday, 31 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Ross Island Room

In this workshop you will learn the techniques of modular construction for making scratch-built wooden structures. A track-side shack of your choice will be made in class to take home.

This hands-on clinic is limited to 20 participants, first come, first served.

All materials and tools will be supplied; sorry, but tools must be returned. The cost of the materials is $20; payment will be collected at the Registration Desk in the hotel prior to the clinic.


Tools and Techniques for Scratch Buildings
Saturday, 31 August, 2:00 - 3:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

In this clinic, you will be given a picture hand out of basic tools needed to make wooden buildings from scratch. Also, proven techniques will be demonstrated for making these wooden buildings.


Make & Take: Railroad Yard Machine Shop
Saturday, 31 August, 4:00 - 5:00, Ross Island Room

In this workshop you will build a Railroad Yard machine shop to take home.

This hands-on clinic is limited to 15 participants, first come, first served.

All materials and tools will be supplied; sorry, but tools must be returned. The cost of the materials is $25; payment will be collected at the Registration Desk in the hotel prior to the clinic.

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Nancy Norris

Nancy Norris, Horticultural Editor for Garden Railways magazine and Garden Lines RR installation, since 1997. Take a look at the book she has written on the subject of gardening.



Landscaping Your Railway
Tuesday, 27 August, 5:00 - 6:00, Mt. Bachelor Room
Thursday, 29 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Mt. Bachelor Room

Clinic attendees will see landscape design in miniature and receive an outline to follow showing the steps to creating a beautiful railway garden. Attendees will learn how to read a chart of suitable slow-growing plants and understand how to choose plants suitable for their habitat. Book: Miniature Garden Guidebook will be on sale.


Hands On: Pruning Railway Trees
Tuesday, 27 August, 7:00 - 8:00, Mt. Bachelor Room

Attendees will choose a 1 gallon woody shrub and remove branches, roots and dirt to look like 1:1 trees in scale after receiving instruction and a demonstration for a range of tree styles.

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Nola Olson

Nola Olson: I needed a baby bear to put up a tree. After two years of fruitless searching I grabbed my first package of Sculpey and my eyes were opened to all the possibilities of polymer clay.







Make & Take: Need Something for Your Railroad? Sculpey It!
Thursday, 29 August, 7:00 - 9:00 (2 hours), Ross Island Room

Learn the basics and possibilities of polymer clay. Readily available at craft stores in many colors, it is as easily manipulated as clay, but without all the mess! Once it has been baked at the low temperature of 275 degrees in your home oven it becomes plastic and has all the properties of soft wood. You can sand it, drill it, and saw it!

Here's some examples of Nola's work.


Melanie, a little girl for the school yard.
Otis, the banjo playing, cranky hermit on the side of the mountain, keeps his moonshine handy....



Loggers

Luigi, the blacksmith, his tongs, horseshoe, forge top, coals, and hood - all Sculpey

Yvonne, the pretty little lady in pink, is in the stagecoach riding herd on her little brother, Mickey, who can barely contain his enthusiasm for his first trip away from Mapleton.

All the luggage on top of the stagecoach (except the china barrel) are Sculpey.

Both swings are metal, but the quilted cover and the afghan are pure Sculpey. Of course, animals are perfect subject for Sculpey, whether they are a running goose, a squirrel, or a baby bear up a tree!

Gert, (short for Gertrude) still in her apron, is the farmer's wife. She is upset because the goat is snacking on her clean clothes.
I made the engineer, Alan Byron Olson the third, a replica of my husband because I thought it was sad to own your own railroad and not be able to drive it.

Tiny, the smallest member of the boy's club, is proving himself worthy by going hand-over-hand from the clubhouse to the nearby tree.

Sometimes it's the small things that add just the right touch to complete a scene - like this pair of red longjohns hanging on the clothesline.

This clinic has room for 20 people to do hands on learning, making a face and hands out of Sculpey that will be baked so you can take them home.

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Roger Rasmussen

Roger Rasmussen has been making model fir trees under the name of Coastmans since 2011. Much of what is made is offered directly through the Coastmans website, but Roger offers trees through several hobby shops around the US, too. He grew up with his grandmother’s Lionel set, and moved on to HO in his teens. As a college student he made models of local buildings in various stages of depreciating condition. This evolved into modeling barns and logging equipment, as well as architectural models. Much of this work is viewable on his model portfolio site, www.coastalmodelworks.com. Roger resides in Port Orford, Oregon, is a working registered nurse, continues with Coastmans trees, and produces dioramas for museums and artistic endeavors.


Creating Realistic Artificial Trees
Friday, 30 August, 4:00 - 5:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

Roger will introduce you to his method of producing realistic scale model fir trees. While much of his work is targeted toward the indoor side of the hobby, Roger makes trees as large as 24 inches and many of the techniques are applicable for outdoor models as well. Topics covered will include different methods of arranging materials about the fir tree armature (trunk), pros and cons of each way of doing it. There will be an intro to the use of the Coastmans foliage material, and the uses and limitations of that. He will also cover fabricating larger scale tree trunks from local materials. Several examples of trees will be provided as well as materials he uses.

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Behren Reeves

Behren Reeves is the founder and president of Keithco Inc., an electronics company that produces wireless products for the model railroading community.  These products control locomotives and all accessories associated with the layout.  Keithco has been offering products since 1992. He has more than four decades experience in the electronics and industrial computer control industry.


Locolinc Series 200
Tuesday, 27 August, 4:00 - 5:00, 3 Sisters Room

The clinic will present an overview of the newest product family of Keithco Inc, continuing the tradition of wireless control products for the model railroad community.

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Terry Veldhuizen

Terry Veldhuizen is semi-retired and living in Elgin Illinois with his wife Carol and Susie, his puppy. Terry has built a small layout in his front yard and is working on a larger layout in the back. With electronics being a major passion, he was very excited about DCC and later LCC and decided that they both should be part of his layouts.


Building a Garden Railroad with Layout Command Control (LCC)
Tuesday, 27 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Mt. Hood Room

Also covers automation for the house and garden.


Implementing Layout Command Control (LCC) in the Garden
Tuesday, 27 August, 4:00 - 5:00, Mt. Hood Room

Layout Command Control (LCC) has NMRA approved standards in place. I am using LCC to control my layout and this presentation describes my progress, trials, and tribulation of this effort.

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Jack Verducci

Jack Verducci is an NMRA master model railroader #363. Jack has been building models since childhood and has been an active garden railroader since 1988. Over the years Jack has had written and co-authored three books and has had several articles published in Garden Railway Magazine and Narrow Gauge & Shoreline Gazette. He has designed and built over 100 model railroads, mostly outdoor. His Crystal Springs Railroad was started in 1988 and is still going strong.

Here's a few pictures of some of the structures that Jack will talk about.

Resin Structures

Hoboken Terminal

Interesting Structure

Forced Perspective

Basic Structures

Detailing Structures

Jack Verducci on right


Building Structures for Your Garden Railroad
Saturday, 31 August, 3:00 - 5:00 (2 hours), Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

I'll discuss building structures starting with kits then kit bashing and scratch building. I'll discuss how to create a plan from photos. I shall talk about building materials glues and adhesive's, paints, decals, and many more related topics.


Garden Railroad Design and Construction
Friday, 30 August, 3:00 - 4:00, Combined Mt. Hood & Mt. St. Helens Room

I will discuss designing and planning a Garden railroad. How to combine model trains, structures, landscaping and plants to create a miniature world. I will touch on operations & how to design a railroad that can be operated like it's full-size counterpart.

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Sharon "Sky" Yankee

With a life long fascination of all things trains, Sharon, along with husband Bob, was part of the founding of Rose City Garden Railroad. Together they built Old Homestead Garden Railroad which has been featured in Garden Railways Magazine.

Sharon found herself constantly trimming 50 containerized Norway Spruce. It didn’t seem fun for Bob to be running trains while she trimmed trees. As a fourth generation nursery person she sought and found slow growing dwarf and miniature plants and began to propagate them. Other members of RCGRS wanted the convenience and beauty of these small cultivars. Soon she was selling plants through Outdoor Rails a Tigard G scale hobby shop. As a result "Mini Forest By Sky" became an online company specializing in “easy to grow plants for all small scale scenes”. At the store Sharon was named “Sky” by her co workers for the initials she used on documents.


Small Scale Trees and Plants
Thursday, 29 August, 7:00 - 8:00, Mt. Bachelor Room

Sharon, a fourth-generation nursery person, will share 30 years of life in a small world of dwarf and miniature plants. She will have a demonstration and slide-show that will include realistic small-scale scenes showing placement of plants, and a planting demo. There will definitely be a Q&A session.


Miniature plants are an easy-care alternative to repeated pruning over the years. It is worth noting that these fore and mid ground trees are 22 years years old in their natural state

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